Coresident Grandparent and Grandchildren!

Current Population Reports
Special Studies

 By Ken Bryson and Lynne M. Casper

   Researchers, public policy makers, and the media first began to notice an increase in
the number of grandchildren living in grandparent maintained households in the
early 1990s. The Census Bureau’s Current Population Report, Marital Status and
Living Arrangements:

March 1992, noted that the number of children under 18 living in grandparent-
maintained households increased from 2.2 million in 1970, to 2.3 million in 1980, to
3.3 million in 1992. In 1970, a little over 3 percent of all children
under age 18 were living in a home maintained by their grandparents (Figure 1). By

1992, this percentage had increased to nearly 5 percent. More recent data show that this trend has continued.

In 1997, 3.9 million children were living in homes maintained by their grandparents — 5.5 percent of all children under 18. Researchers, public policy makers, and the media first began to notice an increase in the number of grandchildren living in grandparentmaintained households in the early 1990s. The Census Bureau’s Current Population Report, Marital Status and Living Arrangements: March 1992, noted that the number of children under 18 living in grandparent-maintained house-holds increased from 2.2 million in 1970, to 2.3 million in 1980, to 3.3 million in 1992. In 1970, a little over 3 percent of all children under age 18 were living in a home maintained by their grandparents (Figure 1). By 1992, this percentage had increased to nearly 5 percent. More recent data show that this trend has continued.

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Accuracy of the Estimates.
All statistics are subject to sampling error, as well as nonsampling error such as survey design flaws, respondent classification and reporting errors, data processing mistakes, and undercoverage. The Census Bureau has taken steps to minimize errors in the form of quality control and editing procedures to reduce errors made by respondents, coders, and interviewers. Ratio estimation to independent age-racesex-Hispanic population controls partially corrects for bias attributable to survey under-coverage. However, biases exist in the estimates when missed individuals have characteristics different from those of interviewed individuals in the same age-race-sex-Hispanic group. Analytical statements in this report have been tested and meet statistical standards. However, because of methodological differences, use caution when comparing these
10 P23-198

U.S. Census Bureau
data with data from other sources.
Contact Thomas F. Moore, Demographic Statistical Methods Division, at 301-457-4215 or on the Internet at thomas.francis.moore.iii@ccmail.
census.gov for information on the source of the data, the accuracy of the estimates, the use of standard errors, and the computation of standard errors.

Contacts
Statistical Information Staff
pop@census.gov
301-457-2422

Ken Bryson
kbryson@census.gov
301-457-2416

Lynne Casper
lcasper@census.gov
301-457-2416

User Comments
The Census Bureau welcomes the comments and advice of users of its data and reports. If you have any suggestions or comments, please write to:
Chief, Population Division
U.S. Bureau of the Census
Washington, DC 20233

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